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  • Clive 8:06 pm on September 11, 2008 Permalink
    Tags: google,   

    Google … again 

    It seems that Google’s power knows no boundaries. Now it wants to digitise thousands of pages of archived print newspapers.

    Is it such a good thing that one company has so much of our public information on its private databases?

     
  • Clive 9:32 pm on June 24, 2008 Permalink
    Tags: , google   

    Is Google making us stupid? – Atlantic Monthly 

    Is Google Making Us Stupid?

    As the media theorist Marshall McLuhan pointed out in the 1960s, media are not just passive channels of information. They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.

    … Thanks to the ubiquity of text on the Internet, not to mention the popularity of text-messaging on cell phones, we may well be reading more today than we did in the 1970s or 1980s, when television was our medium of choice. But it’s a different kind of reading, and
    behind it lies a different kind of thinking—perhaps even a new sense of the self. “We are not only what we read,” says Maryanne Wolf, a developmental psychologist at Tufts University and the author of Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. “We are how we read.”

    …Never has a communications system played so many roles in our lives—or exerted such broad influence over our thoughts—as the Internet does today. Yet, for all that’s been written about the Net, there’s been little consideration of how, exactly, it’s reprogramming us. The Net’s intellectual ethic remains obscure.

    Most of the proprietors of the commercial Internet have a financial stake in collecting the crumbs of data we leave behind as we flit from link to link—the more crumbs, the better. The last thing these companies want is to encourage leisurely reading or slow, concentrated
    thought. It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.

    …The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained,
    undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.

    Link this to the research on screen reading and new book on search from catalogue (link).

     
  • Clive 9:28 pm on June 20, 2008 Permalink
    Tags: , google,   

    Search Monitor: Toward a Measure of Transparency 

    Nart Villeneuve – Search Monitor: Toward a Measure of Transparency

    Citizen Lab Occasional Paper #1, “Search Monitor Project: Toward a Measure of Transparency“, (mirror) has been released today. This report interrogates and compares the censorship practices of the search engines provided by Google, Microsoft and Yahoo! for the Chinese market along with the domestic Chinese search engine Baidu. It is based on tests conducted between November 2007 and April 2008 focused on uncovering web sites that have been censored from search engine results.

    The report finds that although Internet users in China are able to access more information due to the presence of foreign search engines the web sites that are censored are often the only sources of alternative information available for politically sensitive topics. In addition to censoring the web sites of Chinese dissidents and the Falun Gong movement, the web sites of major news organizations, such as the BBC, as well as international advocacy organizations, such as Human Rights Watch, are also censored.

     
  • Clive 8:30 pm on December 21, 2007 Permalink |
    Tags: , , google, ,   

    Google knols v Wikipedia 

    Google is trying a kind of wikipedia development of a knowledge database but rather than going for anonymity is highlighting authors’ names in order to … increase credibility. It’s still in beta/private. See google knols and the screenshot which might make a good pbwiki wiki model.

    But why not start a wiki for social change staff to build a similar database of key words/ideas that have relevance/resonance for the programme. It would be a way for students to see the community of practice actually practicing.

     
  • Clive 1:39 pm on October 29, 2007 Permalink |
    Tags: google   

    Google and september 11 

    The Effects of September 11 on the Leading Search Engine

    The apparent terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 changed the skyscape of New York City, and the political and emotional landscape of the United States. The attack may have also changed how the leading search engine, Google, thinks of itself. This article examines how people used the Internet in general, and Google in particular, to seek and to deliver desperately wanted information about the lives lost and damage inflicted by the attacks.

    Powered by ScribeFire.

     
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